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By Helene-Carol Brown
Abigail Larke and her Patriot family could never have imagined the sort of destruction Tory raiders and Hessian soldiers could bring to New Jersey. When the port of Elizabeth Town was raided and its revered Academy and popular Patriot church burned, Pastor James Caldwell is forced to remove his family farther inland to the village of Connecticut Farms. Abigail joins the pastor’s household as an assistant nurse to the his nine children. Shortly after, Abigail’s father is beset by Tory highwaymen. The pastor’s wife is shot dead by a brace of enemy musket balls, and the manse in Connecticut Farms is burned to the ground. Abigail rejoins her family now removed to their uncle’s farm near Springfield, New Jersey. Redcoats and Hessians invade Springfield nothing after in an attempt to cross the Wachtung Mountains and capture General Washington at Morristown. A bloody battle ensues. Through it all, two Continental soldiers have become especially important to the Larke family. One helps Pastor James Caldwell, the Fighting Parson, to collect shoes, blankets and food for the famished, freezing Continentals encamped at Morristown. The other is captured, taken to the vile prison ship in New York harbor, and hanged. Who could have fathomed how this enemy behaved? The perils of war made no room for the Sixth Commandment: Thou shalt do no murder.
FORMAT: Softcover
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By Helene-Carol Brown
Abigail Larke and her Patriot family could never have imagined the sort of destruction Tory raiders and Hessian soldiers could bring to New Jersey. When the port of Elizabeth Town was raided and its revered Academy and popular Patriot church burned, Pastor James Caldwell is forced to remove his family farther inland to the village of Connecticut Farms. Abigail joins the pastor’s household as an assistant nurse to the his nine children. Shortly after, Abigail’s father is beset by Tory highwaymen. The pastor’s wife is shot dead by a brace of enemy musket balls, and the manse in Connecticut Farms is burned to the ground. Abigail rejoins her family now removed to their uncle’s farm near Springfield, New Jersey. Redcoats and Hessians invade Springfield nothing after in an attempt to cross the Wachtung Mountains and capture General Washington at Morristown. A bloody battle ensues. Through it all, two Continental soldiers have become especially important to the Larke family. One helps Pastor James Caldwell, the Fighting Parson, to collect shoes, blankets and food for the famished, freezing Continentals encamped at Morristown. The other is captured, taken to the vile prison ship in New York harbor, and hanged. Who could have fathomed how this enemy behaved? The perils of war made no room for the Sixth Commandment: Thou shalt do no murder.
FORMAT: Hardcover
OUR PRICE:
$29.99
By H. Viscount Nelson Jr.
These insightful words stated during the 1930s by Reverend Richard Robert Wright Jr. spoke to a twentieth-century reality that white Americans held toward the nation’s black citizenry. African Americans of higher station resented being judged by the less-successful members of the race. After the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, class distinctions between African Americans became increasingly significant. With the legal demise of racial discrimination, scores of ambitious blacks who embraced middle-class values took advantage of newly created opportunities to enter mainstream America. Ambitious African Americans who coveted a higher standard of living displayed a quest for higher education, presented evidence of a strong work ethic, and endorsed the concept of deferred gratification.
FORMAT: E-Book
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$3.99
By H. Viscount Nelson Jr.
These insightful words stated during the 1930s by Reverend Richard Robert Wright Jr. spoke to a twentieth-century reality that white Americans held toward the nation’s black citizenry. African Americans of higher station resented being judged by the less-successful members of the race. After the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, class distinctions between African Americans became increasingly significant. With the legal demise of racial discrimination, scores of ambitious blacks who embraced middle-class values took advantage of newly created opportunities to enter mainstream America. Ambitious African Americans who coveted a higher standard of living displayed a quest for higher education, presented evidence of a strong work ethic, and endorsed the concept of deferred gratification.
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$19.99
By H. Viscount Nelson Jr.
These insightful words stated during the 1930s by Reverend Richard Robert Wright Jr. spoke to a twentieth-century reality that white Americans held toward the nation’s black citizenry. African Americans of higher station resented being judged by the less-successful members of the race. After the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, class distinctions between African Americans became increasingly significant. With the legal demise of racial discrimination, scores of ambitious blacks who embraced middle-class values took advantage of newly created opportunities to enter mainstream America. Ambitious African Americans who coveted a higher standard of living displayed a quest for higher education, presented evidence of a strong work ethic, and endorsed the concept of deferred gratification.
FORMAT: Hardcover
OUR PRICE:
$29.99
By James Steffes ENC Retired
A Swift Boat is sunk by two rockets from an unidentified aircraft near the border between North and South Vietnam. It is June 15/16th, 1968, around midnight, and now five sailors are dead or missing. Two survivors and several witnesses report seeing lighted aircraft that move and hover like helicopters flying in the area. U.S. Jets are scrambled to the scene and report hits on enemy aircraft. The following night the jets return hunting the elusive helicopters and in the confusion, one American Cruiser and one Australian Frigate, are hit by air-to-air missiles. The result is two dead and eleven wounded aboard the Australian ship and minor damage to the American Cruiser. An investigation, based on pieces of U.S. Missiles found on the two ships, determine that it was “friendly fire”. This sailor was aboard another Swift Boat, PCF-12, patrolling south of the sunken boats position. Ordered to the scene to assist in the rescue, PCF-12 came under attack by helo type aircraft, identified as hostile, receiving one rocket and machine gun fire. This Swift Boat returned a deadly barrage of 50 caliber machine gun and other small arms fire causing the two helos to break contact and run away. The crew believes that one of the helos was damaged or shot down by this hail of gunfire. The investigation findings were “friendly fire” mostly because of the lack of wreckage of the helos and the pieces of Sparrow missiles found on board USS Boston and HMAS Hobart. News accounts attempted to connect the two incidents by blaming the same pilots for attacking the ships and sinking the Swift Boat. This book uses official records, logs, and message traffic to back up eye witness testimonies that refute the “friendly fire” decision. There are many people affected by this story. Those of us that were there have carried pieces of this incident in our memories for 37 years. Families and friends of the dead and missing have wondered about the truth behind the decision of “friendly fire” vs “hostile fire”. This book will answer many of those questions and put many lives at rest again. James W. Steffes ENC, USN Retired
FORMAT: Hardcover
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By Horace Rice
Patriot Pinn’s Pearl, a historical fiction account, chronicles the lives of a rare Native American tribe of mixed Cherokee and Wiccocomico, unique and distinctive by its extraordinary ingenuity and strength to survive several hundred years, despite colonial settlers’ racial hatred and attempts to take its lands and destroy its aboriginal heritage. The most prominent character during the eight generations noted in this account is Chief Raleigh Pinn, a Wiccocomico and Cherokee from Wiccocomico Indian Town in the Northern Neck area of Virginia. Having been an indentured child servant for English settlers who confiscated his ancestors’ official reservation lands, Raleigh learned the ways of the settlers, moved to Central Virginia at the end of his Northern Neck indentured servitude, purchased properties in Buckingham and Amherst Counties, and provided a haven for his family and other dispersed Cherokee and Wiccocomico people. The reader will empathize with Raleigh and his descendants’ reactions to colonial settlers and the hardships these settlers caused in the early to mid-1700s through the mid-1800s, as well as his tribe’s struggles to survive in a hostile milieu. Initially hating the colonial settlers, he grapples to control his deep animosity for everything “Anglo” as he models survival strategies for his indigenous people. He purchases several hundred acres of land, becomes a prosperous farmer, joins the Amherst Militia, and participates in several Revolutionary War military campaigns, including the decisive battle at Yorktown. He establishes, unites, and protects his people in two Cherokee villages that are separated by the James River, during his years in Amherst and Buckingham Counties. Raleigh’s faith in God and his keen awareness of his royal heritage provides the essential self-confidence required to tame his animosity and teach his people how to coexist with white settlers in a world that makes survival for Native Americans almost impossible. This is a story of Raleigh’s skillful ability to pass on history and heritage to his progeny and to exhibit his love rather than hatred for his neighbors, and in the process, he serves as a model for his descendants’ achievement and tolerance. This book also includes events in the life of other tribal members, Native American Revolutionary War patriots and their children and grandchildren, who are ancestors of the present-day members of the United Cherokee Indian Tribe of Virginia (UCITOVA). At the end of Patriot Pinn’s Pearl, the author has included a short historical chronicle of UCITOVA.
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$9.99
By Horace Rice
Patriot Pinn’s Pearl, a historical fiction account, chronicles the lives of a rare Native American tribe of mixed Cherokee and Wiccocomico, unique and distinctive by its extraordinary ingenuity and strength to survive several hundred years, despite colonial settlers’ racial hatred and attempts to take its lands and destroy its aboriginal heritage. The most prominent character during the eight generations noted in this account is Chief Raleigh Pinn, a Wiccocomico and Cherokee from Wiccocomico Indian Town in the Northern Neck area of Virginia. Having been an indentured child servant for English settlers who confiscated his ancestors’ official reservation lands, Raleigh learned the ways of the settlers, moved to Central Virginia at the end of his Northern Neck indentured servitude, purchased properties in Buckingham and Amherst Counties, and provided a haven for his family and other dispersed Cherokee and Wiccocomico people. The reader will empathize with Raleigh and his descendants’ reactions to colonial settlers and the hardships these settlers caused in the early to mid-1700s through the mid-1800s, as well as his tribe’s struggles to survive in a hostile milieu. Initially hating the colonial settlers, he grapples to control his deep animosity for everything “Anglo” as he models survival strategies for his indigenous people. He purchases several hundred acres of land, becomes a prosperous farmer, joins the Amherst Militia, and participates in several Revolutionary War military campaigns, including the decisive battle at Yorktown. He establishes, unites, and protects his people in two Cherokee villages that are separated by the James River, during his years in Amherst and Buckingham Counties. Raleigh’s faith in God and his keen awareness of his royal heritage provides the essential self-confidence required to tame his animosity and teach his people how to coexist with white settlers in a world that makes survival for Native Americans almost impossible. This is a story of Raleigh’s skillful ability to pass on history and heritage to his progeny and to exhibit his love rather than hatred for his neighbors, and in the process, he serves as a model for his descendants’ achievement and tolerance. This book also includes events in the life of other tribal members, Native American Revolutionary War patriots and their children and grandchildren, who are ancestors of the present-day members of the United Cherokee Indian Tribe of Virginia (UCITOVA). At the end of Patriot Pinn’s Pearl, the author has included a short historical chronicle of UCITOVA.
FORMAT: Hardcover
OUR PRICE:
$34.99
By Horace Rice
Patriot Pinn’s Pearl, a historical fiction account, chronicles the lives of a rare Native American tribe of mixed Cherokee and Wiccocomico, unique and distinctive by its extraordinary ingenuity and strength to survive several hundred years, despite colonial settlers’ racial hatred and attempts to take its lands and destroy its aboriginal heritage. The most prominent character during the eight generations noted in this account is Chief Raleigh Pinn, a Wiccocomico and Cherokee from Wiccocomico Indian Town in the Northern Neck area of Virginia. Having been an indentured child servant for English settlers who confiscated his ancestors’ official reservation lands, Raleigh learned the ways of the settlers, moved to Central Virginia at the end of his Northern Neck indentured servitude, purchased properties in Buckingham and Amherst Counties, and provided a haven for his family and other dispersed Cherokee and Wiccocomico people. The reader will empathize with Raleigh and his descendants’ reactions to colonial settlers and the hardships these settlers caused in the early to mid-1700s through the mid-1800s, as well as his tribe’s struggles to survive in a hostile milieu. Initially hating the colonial settlers, he grapples to control his deep animosity for everything “Anglo” as he models survival strategies for his indigenous people. He purchases several hundred acres of land, becomes a prosperous farmer, joins the Amherst Militia, and participates in several Revolutionary War military campaigns, including the decisive battle at Yorktown. He establishes, unites, and protects his people in two Cherokee villages that are separated by the James River, during his years in Amherst and Buckingham Counties. Raleigh’s faith in God and his keen awareness of his royal heritage provides the essential self-confidence required to tame his animosity and teach his people how to coexist with white settlers in a world that makes survival for Native Americans almost impossible. This is a story of Raleigh’s skillful ability to pass on history and heritage to his progeny and to exhibit his love rather than hatred for his neighbors, and in the process, he serves as a model for his descendants’ achievement and tolerance. This book also includes events in the life of other tribal members, Native American Revolutionary War patriots and their children and grandchildren, who are ancestors of the present-day members of the United Cherokee Indian Tribe of Virginia (UCITOVA). At the end of Patriot Pinn’s Pearl, the author has included a short historical chronicle of UCITOVA.
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$23.99
By Koichi Mera
COMFORT WOMEN NOT SEX-SLAVES Presents an alternative view about Comfort Women to the prevailing one in the United States, but is well established among intellectuals in Japan. This is a story of misconception which took place with evil intention of a few persons, but spread widely in the world as a wild fire. One promoter was Asahi Newspaper, hither-to highly respected national newspaper of Japan, but which confessed its mistakes in the summer of 2014. This was a significant momentum in changing the view on Comfort Women of many in Japan. This book is dedicated to revising the knowledge on Comfort Women of English- speaking people in light of new developments.
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Abdellatif Lahlali
Some of my earliest memories of my Father are when I used to run into the garage at our old house, where he had carved himself a little crowded room normally used for storage. It was his half-radio-room-and-half-hangout place. My Father would spend hours during his days off from work in this wonderful “cave.” Here he would put on two, sometimes three, old Marconi Short-Wave Radios tuned to different Commercial Maritime Stations, as well as his Radio/Morse Transreceiver Station, all of them transmitting hundreds of messages using Radio and Morse code, Dits and Dots from all of dozens of Maritime Land Stations that monitor the traffic of Merchant Ships crossing the Strait of Gibraltar. My Father was a consummate Radio and Telegraph Operator who worked with the Moroccan Government, specifically the Ministry of Post, Telegraph, and Telephone. His job was to make contact with Ships crisscrossing the Straits of Gibraltar to help direct their traffic through Moroccan Territorial Waters, and Ports, thousands of ships using mainly Morse code.
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$3.99
By Helen Brown
My parents grew up in a time that most of us only read about in history books. They saw history made many times. Their generation created the advantages that we take for granted today. Like us they, too, had to rely on the Lord Jesus for strength, courage, and pure grit to get through the dangers they faced each day. They still managed to raise five healthy children, all of whom are capable productive members of society. There was a great variety of experiences throughout their lives and through these have been able to learn and grow as part of the Australian community. These lessons have been passed on to not only their children but to the many people that they have come into contact with throughout their days in ministry, farming, and community service as well. They unselfishly offered me this project. I am pleased to be able to share some of their lessons with the whole wide world through this book. As I presented each article, I was made aware that there was an extra blessing that I could claim. I have added these at the end of each contribution. We, their children, have been very blessed to have had such wonderful parents as our role models in life. My prayer is that this book may bring some insight into what life was like in times past. May it also help us all to be grateful for the determination that their generation had to give us the advantages we have today!
FORMAT: E-Book
OUR PRICE:
$4.99
By Helen Brown
My parents grew up in a time that most of us only read about in history books. They saw history made many times. Their generation created the advantages that we take for granted today. Like us they, too, had to rely on the Lord Jesus for strength, courage, and pure grit to get through the dangers they faced each day. They still managed to raise five healthy children, all of whom are capable productive members of society. There was a great variety of experiences throughout their lives and through these have been able to learn and grow as part of the Australian community. These lessons have been passed on to not only their children but to the many people that they have come into contact with throughout their days in ministry, farming, and community service as well. They unselfishly offered me this project. I am pleased to be able to share some of their lessons with the whole wide world through this book. As I presented each article, I was made aware that there was an extra blessing that I could claim. I have added these at the end of each contribution. We, their children, have been very blessed to have had such wonderful parents as our role models in life. My prayer is that this book may bring some insight into what life was like in times past. May it also help us all to be grateful for the determination that their generation had to give us the advantages we have today!
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$24.19
By Abdellatif Lahlali
Some of my earliest memories of my Father are when I used to run into the garage at our old house, where he had carved himself a little crowded room normally used for storage. It was his half-radio-room-and-half-hangout place. My Father would spend hours during his days off from work in this wonderful “cave.” Here he would put on two, sometimes three, old Marconi Short-Wave Radios tuned to different Commercial Maritime Stations, as well as his Radio/Morse Transreceiver Station, all of them transmitting hundreds of messages using Radio and Morse code, Dits and Dots from all of dozens of Maritime Land Stations that monitor the traffic of Merchant Ships crossing the Strait of Gibraltar. My Father was a consummate Radio and Telegraph Operator who worked with the Moroccan Government, specifically the Ministry of Post, Telegraph, and Telephone. His job was to make contact with Ships crisscrossing the Straits of Gibraltar to help direct their traffic through Moroccan Territorial Waters, and Ports, thousands of ships using mainly Morse code.
FORMAT: Softcover
OUR PRICE:
$23.99
By Abdellatif Lahlali
Some of my earliest memories of my Father are when I used to run into the garage at our old house, where he had carved himself a little crowded room normally used for storage. It was his half-radio-room-and-half-hangout place. My Father would spend hours during his days off from work in this wonderful “cave.” Here he would put on two, sometimes three, old Marconi Short-Wave Radios tuned to different Commercial Maritime Stations, as well as his Radio/Morse Transreceiver Station, all of them transmitting hundreds of messages using Radio and Morse code, Dits and Dots from all of dozens of Maritime Land Stations that monitor the traffic of Merchant Ships crossing the Strait of Gibraltar. My Father was a consummate Radio and Telegraph Operator who worked with the Moroccan Government, specifically the Ministry of Post, Telegraph, and Telephone. His job was to make contact with Ships crisscrossing the Straits of Gibraltar to help direct their traffic through Moroccan Territorial Waters, and Ports, thousands of ships using mainly Morse code.
FORMAT: Hardcover
OUR PRICE:
$34.99