The Piano Tuner's Daughter
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The Piano Tuner's Daughter
My Bestfriend
Published:
8/8/2013
Format:
Casebound Hardcover
Pages:
24
Size:
8.5x11
ISBN:
978-1-48366-182-7
Print Type:
Color

Ingrid Silvian has written a memorable story for children that will help them understand what it was really like to live through events of WWII, how children just like them adapt and survive. Through vignettes in the lives of two young girl friends, one Jewish, one Christian, we experience how everything changed when the Nazis came. Silvian provides a child's eye view of war, both mundane and profound – a shift from marbles to shrapnel as the treasure of choice; racing to catch the last train carrying evacuees out of the city – and ultimately, who was saved and who was sacrificed.

At a time when many of the first hand witnesses of this chilling chapter of history are passing away, Silvian's story provides a valuable link that reaches across generations that will live on in the hearts and minds of a new generation of children.

Pam Spence, editor, Ohio Jewish Chronicle, Columbus, OH

Preview coming soon.
Ingrid was born in Solingen, Germany in 1930. She and her mother moved to Cologne when she was 4 years old, where she grew up. During the last couple of years of WWII, they stayed in East Germany to escape the bombings. Ingrid came to the US in 1953 as a war bride with her one year old daughter. In later life, she published essays on social issues under Beacon Press (Boston) and others, as well as a monthly column for the SENIOR TIMES of Columbus Ohio for ten years, where she made her home for the last thirty-three years. Ingrid has lived in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and the Azores Islands. She has three daughters and one grandson.
"Ingrid Silvian has written a memorable story for children that will help them understand what it was really like to live through events of WWII, how children just like them adapt and survive.
Through vignettes in the lives of two young girl friends, one Jewish, one Christian, we experience how everything changed when the Nazis came. Silvian provides a child's eye view of war, both mundane and profound - a shift from marbles to shrapnel as the treasure of choice; racing to catch the last train carrying evacuees out of the city - and ultimately, who was saved and who was sacrificed.
At a time when many of the first hand witnesses of this chilling chapter of history are passing away, Silvian's story provides a valuable link that reaches across generations that will live on in the hearts and minds of a new generation of children."
- Pam Spence, Editor, Ohio Jewish Chronicle, Columbus, OH
Silvian's handsome book is a pleasure to read. She takes us into the sanctuary of a German childhood inw artime, and into the special friendship of two girls in those circumstance. They play in a world of rubble and shrapnel, and tuneless pianos, but through the chaos of war the lovely melody of the friendship of these children persist for us.
Raymond Fitch 
This touching story demonstrates how the strength of childhood friendship can endure an adult world filled with hatred, prejudice, and abomination. Silvian's reminiscence is written in an easy-to-understand style for both young listeners and readers.
Alice Felts 
I found this children's book delightful and it reads with great heart, passion and love. It is a wonderful tool to reach elementary school age children with a history lesson. Good work with authentic insight from a child's memory from a world gone by.
Linda L. Hutchison  
Sympathetically remembered and illustrated, this story tempers disturbing allusions to war, conflict and racism with a child's innocent reflections on friendships formed – and lost. It reflects human nature in its extremes from the profound, enduring effects of kindness to the bone-chilling thud of bombs falling to the earth from the sky…..a very personal yet unflinching unapologetic account of for any generation!
Stevie  
Ingrid Silvian's story tells of the strong tie that developed between her family, their Jewish piano tuner, and his daughter Sonia. Simple details about their relationship flesh out the heartfelt love Ingrid (who lived alone with her mother) felt for Sonia, and Sonia's father. Example: Sonia's father "let me sip on my first cup of coffee, ever. It was a real treat." Because they were Christians, the Nazis removed Ingrid and her mother from Cologne and sent them to the mountains where they were safe from the bombings. Sonia's father was arrested and taken away forever. When it was safe for her and her mother to return to Cologne, Ingrid searched and searched for Sonia but never found her.
Kid Lit Reviewer  
Silvian's handsome book is a pleasure to read. She takes us into the sanctuary of a German Childhood in wartime and into the special friendship of two girls in those circumstances. They Play in a world of rubble, shrapnel, and tuneless pianos, but through the chaos of war the lovely Melody of the friendship of these children persists for us.
Raymond E. Fitch 
A real treasure, a true story teller's story. I was puzzled by the abrupt ending but realized that this is the truth of the story and the lingering sorrow of so many stories of this time.
Ruth D Simons 
 
 


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